Obsessing After Interview

Question:

Immediately after my recent interview, I started feeling anxious and worried about my performance. I prepared as thoroughly as possible, including a Professional Practice Interview at FCWS. This was my first interview in a long while, and the job was a great match for me. After the interview, I felt that I could have expressed my fit for the position better. I started second guessing everything, I mean everything. How do I get over the obsessing over a completed interview? Furthermore, what do I do while I wait on the response regarding the position?

 Answer:

First, take a breath.

Second, realize that this is a very normal reaction to any interview. If you doubt it, ask anyone who works at FCWS; everybody has a story.

 If you decide that you left out important information, you might email the interviewer. Say something like, “It occurred to me that you might like to know about (this other experience I’ve had.) This can benefit your company (in the following way.)” Address one issue, or two at most, not every word you said (or didn’t.) You could even enclose an updated resume that features this information.

Some ways to stop obsessing about the interview:

  • Write about what went well, in addition to what you’ll do differently next time. Writing gets it out of your head, and into a form that you control.

  • Keep busy, not only with job search, but regular tasks and hobbies that engage your mind.

  • When you catch yourself thinking about the interview, tell yourself to stop, and force yourself to focus elsewhere.

  • Take seminars at Workforce Services, such as Interview Success. Research topics that interest you. Identify a new skill that you’d like to learn, and find out how to acquire it.

  • Work on your LinkedIn profile and presence (e.g. finding or writing articles to post on your home page, connecting with people who can help your job search, etc.) Not only will your profile benefit, but when the employer looks you up, he’ll find more useful information about you.

What to do while you wait:

The biggest thing is to continue your job search. You always want to have more than one option. Keep researching companies, finding job leads, networking with people who do what you want to do or work where you want to work. Talk with FCWS staff at the American Job Center; new job leads appear every day.

If this job doesn’t pan out, you’ll continue your job search and have more and more interviews. It’s easy to obsess over one interview, especially when you haven’t done one for a while. As you do more interviews, you’ll develop more skill, and your comfort level will increase. Sometime soon, one of those interviews will be followed by an offer. Be patient with yourself; it will all work out.

 

Julie Anderson